Introducing Day After the Disco

Day After the Disco

If you have seen our posts on Social Media lately, you know we finally started shipping our new Day After the Disco™  5-HTP supplement. 

We named our supplement Day After the Disco™ because in party-culture lore, people are often advised by friends to take 5-HTP after taking recreational substances which deplete their serotonin levels. Serotonin is also known as the happy chemical.

We don’t encourage recreational drug use and recommend always seeking a healthcare professional for any advice on supplement interactions and medical conditions. However, we ARE excited about all of the work MAPS is doing on some of these substances’ therapeutic potentials. We are huge supporters of everything MAPS does.

Sleep, diet, water, and routine are everything. Before we go into 5-HTP - we'd like to state there are a lot of factors that contribute to depression and well-being. Please go to your doctor if you're experiencing any symptoms of depression. Some naturopaths have been heavily criticized by the medical community by leaning too heavily on 5-HTP alone. We think learning how our bodies work is fun, if you'd like to learn more the University of McGill in Quebec created this great website to learn more about our brain processes.

Now onto 5-HTP

What is 5-HTP? 5-HTP (5-Hydroxytryptophan) is a precursor to Serotonin. Our 5-HTP supplement is made by Griffonia Seed Extract. In theory, by taking a 5-HTP supplement, you’re making it easier for your body to create serotonin.* 

Seratonin is believed to play a factor in mood regulation, general well-being, sleep, appetite, and more. Serotonin synthesizes the hormone Melatonin, which plays a part in our natural sleep/wake patterns. Healthy Serotonin levels = encourages healthy melatonin levels. 

Studies have shown that we can deplete serotonin in several ways; many of them don’t involve a party from the night before. :) Our mood/well-being is more critical during quarantine than ever, especially as we head into fall and winter. 

  1. This study suggests there is a correlation between healthy serotonin levels and sunshine on the skin. There are a lot of contributing factors to seasonal affective disorder but some scientists believe the lack of serotonin from the sunshine on skin may be one contributing factor.
  2. This study on lab rats suggests that prolonged lack of sleep can desensitize the neurotransmitters responsible for serotonin production. 
  3. Healthy serotonin levels are primarily related to our gut health. Carbohydrates are a natural way of producing serotonin, a lot of diets are calling to cut carbs - so immediately following, you could have less naturally occurring serotonin. 
  4. The same goes for nicotine (and other similar substances) - which creates a boost of serotonin - a pleasurable feeling; quitting nicotine can leave you feeling the opposite way because you have become dependent on this uptick. 

There are many natural ways to get Serotonin without a supplement; it is typically found in foods like meats, cheeses, and various types of nuts. Sunshine and exercise are all-natural ways to encourage healthy serotonin levels. More studies still need to be done on 5-HTP. We’ve said it a lot on our site, but nothing will ever replace a solid sleep schedule, a well-balanced diet, and regular exercise. For those who are depleted of serotonin - supplementing with 5-HTP may help encourage serotonin synthesis.* If you're interested in a 5-HTP supplement we encourage you to try Day After the Disco 5HTP.

Always consult with a medical professional if you’re concerned about healthy serotonin levels or on any sort of anti-depressant medication. We are not medical experts and cannot offer medical advice. Having a good relationship with your doctor or medical practitioner is priceless. 


    1. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3415362/
    2. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/17629409/
    3. https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/232248
    4. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/16408408/
    5. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/8697046/
    6. https://dancesafe.org/drug-information/ecstasy-and-depression/
    7. https://maps.org/
    8. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3779905/
    9. https://thebrain.mcgill.ca/flash/d/d_11/d_11_m/d_11_m_cyc/d_11_m_cyc.html#:~:text=Melatonin%20is%20produced%20at%20night,sleep%2C%20and%20in%20REM%20sleep.

* These statements have not been evaluated by the FDA. These products are not intended to treat, cure, or prevent any disease. Do not use these products instead of regular medication.